Visiting the Mary Rose Museum on Portsmouth Harbour. Learning made fun on a family day out.

Visiting the Mary Rose Museum on Portsmouth Harbour. Learning made fun on a family day out.

In a cool, dark atrium in Portsmouth Harbour, just behind HMS Victory, sits a ‘good news’ story of our time. It’s the Mary Rose, one of the Tudor warships beloved of King Henry VIII. After distinguishing herself in battle against the French and Scots, tragedy struck and she sank in battle in 1545. Out of a crew of 500, only around 34 survived. The ship lay at the bottom of the Solent for hundreds of years, until a crew of talented scientists, divers and archaeologists, led by Dr Margaret Rule, were finally successful in raising the Mary Rose in 1982. Now, her home is the Mary Rose Museum Portsmouth, south England.

Mary Rose Museum

Ahoy there! The Mary Rose is behind my daughter, in the grey museum building

What’s at the Mary Rose Museum?

The three-storey climate-controlled building is so much more than just the resting place of a grand old Tudor vessel. But the Mary Rose ship lies at the heart of the place. Quite literally. She resides in a three-storey atrium, with a walkway at each level, and floor-to-ceiling glass so that visitors can see her from different perspectives as they stroll around.

Our first glimpse of the Mary Rose quite literally took our breaths away. Only half of the ship was salvaged, so we could see right into the skeleton of the vessel. The moody lighting was perfectly cast, so that every joist, beam and panel was brought into sharp relief. My two children, aged eight and six, were mesmerised, and stopped their usual headlong rushing around, to just stand and gaze.

Mary Rose Museum

Awe-inspiring. The Mary Rose ship takes your breath away when you first see her.

The walkways took us around three corners of the ship. Each new floor gave a different aspect. The upper floors let us see the graceful sweep of the enormous vessel. The bottom floor brought us up close, so it felt as though our noses were amost pressed against the ship’s hull. The highest walkway was partially open. Even after almost 500 years, the woody, earthy scent of the timber ship still hung in the air, and a low creaking, groaning sound increased the feeling of being on board the ship, sailing out to do King Henry VIII’s bidding.

Mary Rose Museum

Three levels of walkways let visitors see the Mary Rose from different angles.

Every ten minutes or so, the lights shining onto the Mary Rose dimmed, and a video show was projected onto the ship’s side. It showed the ship’s men at work (and they were all men, apparently – no women were allowed on board.). Sailors carved wood, bellowed at each other, visited the surgeon, and kept a lookout for enemy vessels. My son, in particular, loved this mini-show, especially because it included a young boy sweeping the deck. At ten, the youngest crew member wouldn’t have been much older than him.

What did they find in the wreckage of the Mary Rose ship?

One thing that surprised me in the Mary Rose Museum was the number of items they managed to recover from the wreckage – intact and, in a lot of cases, extremely delicate. My two were intrigued by the skeleton of the ship’s dog. How did they find all the bones, tiny as they were? The exhibition really brought home to us, how skilled the people excavating the ship must have been. Over 19,000 items were found, and it’s believed there are still more to be discovered.

skeleton of the Mary Rose ship's dog

Divers even managed to find the skeleton of a ships’ dog in the wreckage of the Mary Rose.

These treasures gave the children a real sense of what life would have been like on board. We saw the leather jerkin of the Master Gunner, the slippers worn on board, shining Sovereigns, Angels and half-Angels used as currency by the crew, and an enormous purser’s chest where the money was kept.

We read that most of the crew would have lived in cramped, smelly conditions, with only one change of clothes, so if they were splashed by waves, they would have just had to keep their wet clothes on until they dried. Excavators found no toilets, so they thought the men probably had to lean over the side of the ship to do their business.

cooking pot in the Mary Rose Museum

Meals for the crew of the Mary Rose were prepared in one enormous pot.

Preparing food for such a large crew was an important job. The Head Cook was paid as much as the Master Carpenter and Master Gunner: 10 shillings a month. All the meals were cooked up in one enormous cauldron, although the officers had individual, better-quality meals made for them.

Interactive displays at the Mary Rose Museum

The Mary Rose Museum could so easily have just been a display of all these fascinating items, but they’ve taken it several stages further, with a decent amount of interactive displays. Near the Chef’s cauldron, a game let you choose ingredients for meals, cook them up and see whether the crew and officers liked them. A display played different songs, using pipes, a lute, or a combination of the instruments found on board. Players chose different cannons to shoot enemy warships on a screen. And, near the entrance of the museum, a huge panoramic display showed Henry Tudor’s Portsmouth, with all his ships sailing out to sea.

Mary Rose Museum

Visitors could explore Tudor Portsmouth on a huge panoramic screen.

The friendly staff and volunteers at the museum really knew their stuff. Some were in period dress; a real-life Henry VIII wandered round, answering questions and posing for photos. And some staff sat at tables, with real-life artefacts from the ship. My daughter got to handle an arrow, and my son picked up a piece of gnarled old ship’s rope, all briny and heavy.

Mary Rose Museum

Volunteers at the Mary Rose Museum showed visitors artefacts from the ship.

Visitors who fancied themselves as archers could try out their strength on a longbow. You needed biceps of steel to draw it. The law at the time said children had to start practising from the age of seven.

Mary Rose Museum

Children were required to practise archery from the age of seven.

It wouldn’t be a family-friendly museum without a good old bit dressing-up, and the Mary Rose Museum featured a selection of clothes worn in the Tudor era. But while in some museums this is the highlight of a trip, there were so many other exciting things for children to see and do at the Mary Rose, that the dressing-up was just a sideshow.

Mary Rose Museum

Dressing up at the Mary Rose Museum.

Family activities at the Mary Rose Museum

As well as the permanent interactive displays, depending on the season, entrance to the Mary Rose Museum may include extra family activities. We visited at the start of the summer holidays. A ‘Tudor England Brick by Brick’ build had just begun. Visitors could pay £6 to help put together a LEGO version of the Cowdray Engraving, a Tudor townscape of Portsmouth from the days of the Mary Rose.

Mary Rose Museum LEGO build

Helping to build a reconstruction of the 12m Cowdray Engraving.

The children loved doing this. As well as constructing a carefully planned out square of the engraving, they made cannonballs out of LEGO, and emerged from the tent proudly clutching certificates to say they’d been part of the build.

Mary Rose Museum LEGO build

My daughter, putting her mark on the reconstructed Cowdray Engraving.

The Cowdray Engraving build runs until 12 September 2018 along with a special ‘kids go free’ summer promotion.

As well as LEGO, visitors over the summer of 2018 can see displays of some of the skills used in the Tudor period. We watched shipwrights at work sawing, hewing and cleaving, just as they would have done when the Mary Rose was built. The dockyard’s picnic area rang with the sound of chopping, and a low buzz of conversation as the craftsmen swapped tips, and occasionally stood up to explain to visitors what they were doing. One of the shipwrights was Chris Dobbs, part of the original team of divers who resurrected the Mary Rose. Another was Dr Damian Goodburn, an international expert in medieval shipbuilding. It felt really special to be watching these experts at work.

Mary Rose Museum

Medieval shipwrights at work, including Dr Damian Goodburn, on the right.

Verdict: an all-round fantastic family day out

There’s more than enough in the Mary Rose Museum to keep family visitors happy for a big chunk of a day. Children aged five and above would get the most out of the experience, although younger children would enjoy some aspects, like some of the interactive displays, and the dressing up.

Henry VIII's Mary Rose

The Mary Rose warship, as she would have looked just before she sank in 1545.

Food and drink at the Mary Rose Museum

We ate in Boathouse no. 7, a pleasant, bright space with a funky nautical vibe, and a wide range of delicious, wholesome food. I ate fresh pasta with arrabiata sauce, drizzled with chilli oil and a sprinkling of chilli flakes, but I could have chosen a sourdough pizza from the pizza oven, or home-made soup.

Food and drink at the Mary Rose Museum

Visitors could top their soup with a sprinkling of chilli flakes or poppy seeds.

Food and drink at the Mary Rose Museum

The children opted for kids’ lunchboxes.

If the savoury options weren’t tempting enough, there was a staggering array of cakes, and a Willy Wonka-esque pick-and-mix display of sweets.

Food and drink at the Mary Rose Museum

Cakes at Boathouse No. 7

Food and drink at the Mary Rose Museum

Pick-n-mix sweets

Beer afficionados could even try a special Mary Rose brew.

Food and drink at the Mary Rose Museum

How much do Mary Rose Museum tickets cost?

A ‘kids go free’ family ticket, for one adult and up to three children, is £16. For two adults, it’s £32. Concessions are available, and a regular child’s ticket is £8. Under-5s go free, although I would say the museum is most suitable for children over five. These prices are valid until 2 September 2018. Check the Mary Rose Museum website for more details.

How to get to the Mary Rose Museum

The museum is inside Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, and the address of the Mary Rose Museum is Main Rd, Portsmouth PO1 3PY.

The nearest train station is Portsmouth Harbour, which is a few minutes’ walk from the dockyard and only around 90 minutes by rail from London Waterloo. During summer 2018 South Western Railway customers can get 20% off their Mary Rose ticket.

National and local bus and coach services stop at The Hard Interchange, two minutes’ walk from the Historic Dockyard.

Visitors who drive via the M27 take junction 12 and follow the ‘Historic Waterfront’ signs. Mary Rose Museum parking is in the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard car park, about 400 metres from the main dockyard entrance.

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Mary Rose Museum

We were guests of the Mary Rose Museum, and I was compensated for my time. All views are my own.

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36 Comments

  1. I remember visiting as a kid and would love to take my three to visit now too, I think they would love it! You’ve packed this with so much useful information so I will be bookmark it for sure.

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:40 am

      I too had flashbacks to my childhood. The Mary Rose always seemed to be on Blue Peter!

  2. July 24, 2018 / 11:08 am

    Oh wow how fascinating! I had never actually heard about this ship or museum until I read this but it sounds like an really awe inspiring day out for the whole family as well as educational!! This is going on our summer list

    Laura x

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:41 am

      I hope you enjoy it as much as we did!

  3. July 24, 2018 / 4:20 pm

    Ohh amazing! I’ve always wanted to go and see the Mary Rose, I find things like this fascinating. I love the fact it’s so interactive so the children would enjoy it as well. Definitely going to visit next time we’re down that way.
    Nat.x

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:43 am

      I think this would be right up your street, Nat x

  4. July 26, 2018 / 9:35 am

    So fascinating, there is so much to do in this wonderful country – we should have a staycation and visit all of these lovely places!

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:43 am

      I think a lot of people are, this year!

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:45 am

      It’s a good offer for the summer.

  5. July 27, 2018 / 2:35 pm

    This looks like such a great day out! I would like it as much as the kids. It is amazing how much they found too..

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:45 am

      You’re right – D and I enjoyed it as much as the kids, too.

  6. July 28, 2018 / 11:29 am

    I drove through Portsmouth about five times in the last year and keep going pass this place and kept thinking that I will go and check it out for sure. Now after reading this and seeing what you can do there, I will try and get there at some point this summer!

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:46 am

      It’s worth stopping for!

  7. Marvi
    July 30, 2018 / 2:03 am

    Even an adult like me would’ve been transfixed by this museum! 😀 I love the displays that the museum had and how it manages to take you back in time by just looking at the exhibits.. I can just agree with you how skilled the people who have excavated the ship were.. Great family activity!

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:47 am

      Yes, the skills on display were interesting to watch. Just like in Tudor times!

  8. July 31, 2018 / 4:16 am

    When I have children I want to being them here! Fun and educational….you have inspired me with this post, thank you! The soup looks delightful and th pastries. I cant believe children started archery at 7!?

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:47 am

      I know – it was a tough life!

  9. July 31, 2018 / 4:36 am

    Love this set up, having the different floors really allows you to see all the details. Sounds like an interesting place, I can’t imagine having to lean over the side of a ship to do my business!

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:48 am

      That did shock me a bit, I have to admit!

  10. July 31, 2018 / 11:52 am

    I don’t think I’ve ever visited the Mary Rose. I love that it’s so interactive and could keep both my girls busy during a visit

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:48 am

      It’s a name that’s been around a while, isn’t it? Definitely worth seeing.

  11. August 1, 2018 / 3:53 am

    Mary Rose Museum sounds really intriguing, a window to a glorious chapter in history. The ship has a poignant and tragic history and the remains and the artefacts recovered tell such a powerful story that the ship seems to come alive. The skeleton of the dog gives makes one travel back in time to when the ship was abuzz with activity and the dog running around among the crew. A great place to head for some learning, nice for the kids too.

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:49 am

      The skeleton did really bring it alive….

  12. August 1, 2018 / 5:48 am

    My favorite museums are the ones that are interactive and hands on! There seems to be a lot more than I would have expected for a vessel museum. I think this is really a great place to expose kids AND adults to really pivotal parts of European history. Thank you for sharing!

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:50 am

      They’ve done a lot of work on making it so much more than just a ship. A brilliant day out for the family.

  13. August 1, 2018 / 8:19 am

    Not only Children, I think even adults will enjoy this place equally. I am completely by the no of items they have found from the shops and that dog skelton is just amazing. Your girl looks so adorable in that dress. Amazing place.

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:50 am

      The divers did an incredible job.

  14. August 1, 2018 / 3:07 pm

    I cannot believe that the ship stayed under the sea for hundreds of years and yet they managed to salvage so much from the wreckage. Especially the dog’s skeleton! I am truly amazed. I can imagine what a great experience it would’ve been to walk around the museum and learn about the ship and life on board, especially for children. It kind of reminds me walking around Pompeii and the displays of the items salvaged from the wreckage. Tragic yet intriguing!

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:51 am

      The skeleton was so impressive. All those tiny bones!

  15. Jennifer Merloy
    August 1, 2018 / 11:00 pm

    This reminds me of the Vasa museum in Sweden. It is really cool how they have found and raised the Mary Rose. I love how you get a complete picture of the ship.

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:51 am

      My friend made that comparison, too. I really want to see the Vasa.

  16. August 2, 2018 / 12:40 pm

    I did not know much about this ship till I read your blog post. It seems quite interesting and the fact that they have salvaged so much has made it even more so. Love the way they have exhibited it using interactive systems. Felt sad seeing the skeleton of that poor dog. Guess it is a reminder of the sad incident of this ship.

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:52 am

      It was a tragedy – so many lost their lives.

  17. August 2, 2018 / 6:43 pm

    What a fascinating place! Great idea of turning a ship into a museum. That dog skeleton though! It must have many stories to tell.

    • Nell
      Author
      August 13, 2018 / 11:53 am

      I wish it could talk!

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