Holiday at Shelwick Court, nr Hereford, with the Landmark Trust

Holiday at Shelwick Court, nr Hereford, with the Landmark Trust

The very first holiday D and I took together as a couple, was to Shelwick Court. The Landmark Trust property sits in the Herefordshire countryside, near the market town of Hereford. From the outside, it looks like a regular, sturdy farmhouse. The front of the house dates back to 1700, so it’s clearly a building with a lot of history. But inside, there’s a surprise.

Shelwick Court

A walk up a creaky wooden staircase, to the first floor, unearths the property’s hidden treasure: a medieval great chamber. The 6-bay timber roof was built in around 1400, and was moved to Shelwick Court from somewhere else. The place is a puzzle, as nobody knows who lived there, or why they took the chamber ceiling to Shelwick. But it’s now a good place to have a relaxed holiday, with a historical edge.

Shelwick Court

The house slept eight, with beat-up sofas furnishing the chamber where grand dinners must have taken place, hundreds of years ago. Board games sat on the chamber’s wooden shelves, and we found antique cutlery in drawers under the chamber’s 12-seater wooden table. The kitchen was small but functional.

Shelwick Court’s small grounds backed onto a field with a friendly horse, and offered pretty views out over the countryside.

Our stay at Shelwick was my first encounter with the Landmark Trust. The charity rescues historic houses that would otherwise be lost, restores them, and markets them as self-catering holiday properties, to keep the heritage alive. Their website describes their 200 properties, across the UK and in Italy, France and Belgium, as

“picturesque pavilions and medieval long-houses, artillery forts and Gothick follies, clan chiefs’ castles and cotton weavers’ cottages, the homes of great writers and the creations of great architects, from Browning to Boswell, from Pugin to Palladio.”

Shelwick Court was on the brink of destruction when the Landmark Trust took it on. Before he died, its elderly owner lived beside it, in a caravan, as the house was unfit to live in. Instead of being bulldozed to the ground, the Landmark Trust turned Shelwick into a place that families and groups can use as a base for country walks, cider-tasting excursions or trips to see castles.

To find out more about Shelwick Court, the Landmark Trust and their other properties, visit their website.

Visit Herefordshire has information on what to do in the area.

Getting there

Shelwick Court’s nearest railway station is Hereford, one and a half miles away.

Pin for later:

Landmark Trust

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Follow:
Like this post? Why not share it:

5 Comments

  1. July 12, 2017 / 10:07 am

    Oh gosh, this looks lovely! And just up the road from us too. I had no idea it was there.
    Nat.x

  2. July 14, 2017 / 2:02 pm

    What an amazing interior! I love that they restore old buildings. What did your family do while you were there?

    • Nell
      Author
      July 21, 2017 / 11:13 am

      Well this was pre-kids, so it was just us adults! We went for a few country walks, and hung out in the pubs. A lovely part of the world.

  3. July 17, 2017 / 10:36 pm

    Wow it looks amazing! We, too, have just discovered Landmark Trust. We stayed in the Old Lighthouse on Lundy island a few weeks back and it was just fantastic (I’ve just reviewed it our blog too! 🙂 )
    They had a remarkable 23 properties on the island, all different historical buildings, from the castle to a mansion to a signal station. I’d definitely love to stay at some of their other properties now in the UK – great to draw kids into history too. Thanks for the heads up on Shelwick Court – how strange they moved the roof from somewhere else!

    • Nell
      Author
      July 21, 2017 / 11:18 am

      Ooh, Lundy sounds like a real treasure trove. I’m off to have a read of your post now!

Leave a Reply

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.